Index to the Book of Remembrance WW1 S-Z

Pollokshields Church

Book of Remembrance

Index

Teach us good Lord
to serve Thee as Thou deservest;
to give and not to count the cost
to fight and not to heed the wounds;
to toil and not to seek for rest;
to labour and not to ask for any reward,
Save that of knowing that we do Thy will
through Jesus Christ our Lord.

1914 -19
INDEX

Name Church
S  
Thomas S. Scobie Albert Drive Church
John Scott Albert Drive Church
William R. Scott Titwood Parish Church
Ian H. C. Shannon Pollokshields East Church
George Sharp MacClellan Street Church
Edmund F. L. Shaw Pollokshields Parish Church
James Shaw Titwood Parish Church
James Shearer MacClellan Street Church
John K. Skinner Pollokshields West Church
Andrew H. Sloan Titwood Parish Church
Arthur J. Sloan Titwood Parish Church
Duncan R. Smith Pollokshields West Church
Andrew Stevenson Pollokshields Parish Church
David J. Stevenson Pollokshields Parish Church
Henry D. Strang Trinity Church
T  
William Thomson MacClellan Street Church
James Threshie Pollokshields East Church
Frank Tower Trinity Church
W  
David Waddell Pollokshields West Church
James H. Waddell Titwood Parish Church
John Walker Albert Drive Church
John T. T. Walker Pollokshields East Church
George Wallace Pollokshields Parish Church
Robert B. Wallace Albert Drive Church
J. Knox Waterston Pollokshields East Church
James S. Westwater Albert Drive Church
Andrew Whitelaw MacClellan Street Church
Robert S. Wiseman Pollokshields West Church and
Titwood Parish Church
John Guthrie Wright Titwood Parish Church
James S. Wyper Pollokshields Parish Church

 

 

Further Details

1914 -19

Thomas Scott Scobbie

He was born on the 6th September 1878 at 54 McKinlay Street, Gorbals, Glasgow to Samuel Harvey Scobbie (Mercantile Clerk) and Janet Scobbie (ms Guthrie).[1]

In 1881 he lived, age 2, at 19 Garturk Street, Gorbals, Glasgow with his parents and brother Andrew (5).[2]

In 1891 he lived, age 12, at 117 Smith Street, Gorbals, Glasgow with his parents and siblings Andrew, Marion (8) and Jenny (5). He was a junior commercial clerk.[3]

In 1901 he lived, age 22, at 189 Langside Road, Gorbals, Glasgow with his parents and siblings. He was a warehouseman.[4]

In 1910 he lived, age 31, in Minneapolis Ward 2, Hennepin, Minnesota. He was a lodger and worked as a clerk in a department store.[5]

He enlisted on the 14th July 1917.
He lived at 2638 Oakland Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
He was an auditor.
His next of kin was his mother, Jeanette Scobbie, 23 Bolton Drive, Glasgow, Scotland. Glasgow.[6]

He was a Lance Corporalin the 44th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Service Number 2173493)
He died on the 2ndS eptember 1918
He is commemorated on Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.[7]

He is commemorated on a cenotaph in Victory Memorial Drive, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA., and in the Glasgow Roll of Honour

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/12 1124
[2]1881 Census 644/12 092 026
[3]1891 Census 644/12 088 117
[4]1901 Census 644/12 065 135
[5]1910 US Federal Census
[6]Canadian Attestation Papers
[7]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1575512/scobbie,-thomas-scott/

 

William Rennie Scott

He was born on the 12th November 1892 at 91 St Andrew’s Road, Pollokshields, Glasgow to Alexander Scott (Commercial Traveller) and Agnes Scott (ms Rennie).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 8, at 137 St. Andrew's Rd., Pollokshields Glasgow with his parents Alexander and Agnes and siblings Alexander (10), Margaret G (4) and James R (4).[2]

In 1911 he continued to live, age 18, at 137, St. Andrew's Rd., with his parents and siblings. He was an ironmonger’s apprentice.[3]

He was a Private in the "B" Coy. 1st/7th Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) (Service No: 1709). 
He died, aged 22, on the 28th June 1915. 
He is buried in the Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, Turkey (including Gallipoli).[4]

He was awarded The 1914/15 Star, The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/13 749
[2]1901 Census 644/13 029 070
[3]1911 Census 644/18 012 056
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/603534/scott,-william-rennie/
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

Ian Herbert Croal Shannon

He was born on the 11th February 1895 at Balbirnie U.F. Manse, Markinch, Fife to John Alexander Shannan (Minister) and Annie Molyson Shannon (ms Croal). His name is John on the birth certificate.[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 6, with his Great Uncle at 7 Bucccleuch Place Edinburgh with his mother.[2]

Son of the Rev. John A. Shannon and Mrs. Annie Molyson Croal Shannon, of Balbirnie U.F. Manse, Markinch, Fife.
He was a Private in 7th Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) (Service No: 2713)
He died, aged 20, on the 16th June 1915.
He is commemorated on Panels 24 to 26 of the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.[3]

He is commemorated in De Ruvigny’s Roll of Honour Volume 1 Page 324, and on the Markinch War Memorial, Balbirnie Street.

He was awarded The 1914/15 Star, The Victory and The British War Medals[4]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 447 28
[2]1901 Census 685/4 054 024
[3]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1561863/SHANNON,%20IAN%20HERBERT%20CROAL
[4]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

George Sharp

He was born on the 24th September 1888 at Househill, Hurlet, Renfrewshire to David Sharp (coachman) and Jane Sharp (ms Samuel).[1]

In 1891 he lived, age 2, at 100 McLellan Street, Govan, Glasgow with his parents and sister Janet (4).[2]

In 1901 he lived, age 12, at 121 Lambhill Street, Govan with his parents and siblings Janet, Thomas (9), William (4), Gertrude (2) and David (3 months)[3]

In 1911 he lived, age 22, at 252 West Scotland Street, Govan with his parents and siblings Thomas, William, Gertrude, David and Jeanie (7). He was a house plumber.[4]

He married Constance Howard Cranston (Restaurant Waitress) on the 31stDecember 1913 at Avon Villa, Havelock Street, Glasgow.[5]

Son of David and Jane S. Sharp, of 56, Paterson St., South Side, Glasgow; husband of Constance Howard Cranston (formerly Sharp), of 71, Lambhill St., South Side, Glasgow.
He was a Private in the 10th Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) (Service No: 28575).
He died, aged 28, on the 1st August 1917.
He is commemorated on Panel 22 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.[6]

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[7]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 572/2 265
[2]1891 Census 646/1 035 001
[3]1901 Census 646A/2 028 076
[4]1911 Census 646/1 018 252
[5]Marriage Certificate 644/20 007
[6]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/916346/SHARP,%20GEORGE
[7]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

Edmund Frederick Lewis Shaw

He was born on the 23rd January 1890 at 9 Gower Street, Kelvinside, Maryhill, Lanarkshire to James Shaw (Burgh Treasurer) and Mary Shaw (ms Irvine). [1]

In 1891 he lived, age 1, at 9 Gower Street, Maryhill, Lanarkshire  with his parents and siblings William (12), John (10), Mary (8), Alexander (7) Elizabeth (5) and James (4).[2]

In 1901 he lived, age 11, at 192 Kenmure Street, Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents and siblings William, John, Mary, Elizabeth, and James. [3]

In 1911 he lived, age 21, at21 Keir Street, Pollokshields with his mother and siblings Alexander and Elizabeth. He was a cotton goods salesman.[4]

Son of James and Mary Irvine Shaw, of 129, Kilmarnock Rd., Glasgow.
He was a Lance Corporal in the 9th (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion Highland Light Infantry (Service No: 331550).
He died, aged 27, on the 7th February 1917.
He is buried in the Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France.[5]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour with address 264 Maxwell Road, Pollokshields. 

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[6]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 622/1 136
[2]1891 Census 622/1 008 204
[3]1901 Census 644/13 036 025
[4]1911 Census 644/18 018 025
[5]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/289192/SHAW,%20EDMUND%20FREDERICK%20LEWIS
[6]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

James Shaw

He was born on the 19th January 1898 at 2 Whitehill Gardens, to the Rev. Adam Shaw, M.A. and Isabella C. Shaw (ms Wyllie).[1]

1n 1901 he lived, age 3, at 2 Whitehill Gardens, Springburn, Glasgow, with his parents and siblings Adam H (10), Catherine (8) and George (1)[2]

In 1911 he lived, age 13, at 32 Regent Park Square, Strathbungo, with his parents and siblings Adam H (20), Catherine W (18), George D (11), Henrietta (9) and Isabella C (6).[3]

He was a Private in the 17th Battalion Highland Light Infantry. (Service Number 2947)
He died on the 1st April 1917, Age 19
He is buried in the Savy British Cemetery, Aisne, France. Cemetery/memorial reference I. A. 19.[4]

He is commemorated on The Albert Road Academy War Memorial and in The Glasgow Roll of Honour (with address 11 Hampden Terrace, Mt Florida ) and The Evening Times Roll of Honour on page 2 of the edition of the 16th April 1917 and on page 5 of the edition of the 27th April 1917. There is a photo.

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/3 179
[2]1901 Census 644/3 046 049
[3]1911 Census 644/18 010 069
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/572953/shaw,-james/
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

James Shearer

In 1913 he lived at 62 Pollok Street, Glasgow, with his brother George. He was student and lodger. In 1914 and 1915 he lived at the same address but was a teacher.[1]

He was a Serjeant (Service No: 331947) in the 9th (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion Highland Light Infantry.
He died on the 12th April 1918.
He is commemorated on Panel 9 of the Ploegsteert Memorial, Hainaut, Belgium.[2]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour. 

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[3]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Glasgow Electoral Registers
[2]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/868238/shearer,-james/
[3]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

John Kendrick Skinner VC, DCM CdeG(F)

John Kendrick Skinner was born on the 5th February 1883 at 76 Henderson Street, Kelvin, Glasgow to Walter Cumming Skinner  (Tailor’s cutter)and Mary Skinner (m.s. Kendrick).[1]

In 1891, he lived, aged 15, at 5 Leven Street, Pollokshields with his Father and siblings Peter (13), Bessie C. (12) and Walter (10).[2]

He married Annie E. Y. Skinner (m.s. Lee), of 173, St. Andrew's Road, Pollokshields, Glasgow, on the 29th September 1917 at 2 St John’s Road, Pollokshields Glasgow.[3]

He served in the Boer war and was awarded the Queen’s South African Medal (with Transvaal, Orange Free State and Cape Colony bars) and the King’s South Africa Medals (with South Africa 1901 and South Africa 1902 bars)[4]

He was Company Serjeant Major in the 1st Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers (Service No: 6895).
He was Awarded the Victoria Cross and Distinguished Conduct Medal. He was also awarded the Croix de Guerre (France).
He died, aged 35, on the 17th March 1918. He is buried in the Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.[5]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour. His DCM is recorded in De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour, 1914-1919, Volume 3. He is commemorated in the Evening Times Roll of Honour on page 3 of the edition of the 22nd January 1915. There is a photo.

A WW1 centenary paving stone in his memory was unveiled by Glasgow's Lord Provost Eva Bolander, witnessed by proud relatives, outside the People's Palace, the museum that chronicles Glaswegians' lives on Wednesday16th August at 2pm. Representatives of Pollokshields Church and Pollokshields Heritage were in attendance. (Full details can be found at https://www.glasgow.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=21535)

A wreath was laid on behalf of Pollokshields Church by Stuart Crawford.

He was awarded the 1914 Star, Victory and The British War Medalss.[6]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/9 252
[2]1891 Census 644/13 043 055
[3]Marriage Certificate 644/18 280
[4]De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour, 1914-1919, Volume 3
[5]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/143207/SKINNER,%20JOHN%20KENDRICK
[6]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

Andrew Hamilton Sloan

He was born on the 20th May 1893 at 8 South Dean Place, Mount Florida, Renfrewshire to Arthur Frank Sloan (Woolen Manufacturer) and Marion Granger Sloan (ms Hamilton).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 7, at 39 Clincart Road, Cathcart, Renfrewshire with his parentsand siblings Arthur I (7) and Winifred (10 months).[2]

In 1911 he lived, age 17, at 28, Second Avenue, Cathcart, Renfrewshire with his parents and siblings Arthur and Winifred.[3]


He was a Private in the 6th Battalion Highland Light Infantry (Service No: 26357). 
He died, aged 23, on the 1st July 1916.
He is commemorated on Pier and Face 15 C of the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France.[4]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour. 

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate560 199
[2]1901 Census 560B 036 009
[3]1911 Census 560 001 073
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1553398/SLOAN,%20ANDREW%20HAMILTON
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

Arthur James Sloan

He was born on the 20th May 1893 at 8 South Dean Place, Mount Florida, Renfrewshire to Arthur Frank Sloan (Woolen Manufacturer) and Marion Granger Sloan (ms Hamilton).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 7, at 39 Clincart Road, Cathcart, Renfrewshire with his parentsand siblings Andrew H (7) and Winifred (10 months).[2]

In 1911 he lived, age 17, at 28, Second Avenue, Cathcart, Renfrewshire with his parents and siblings Arthur and Winifred.[3]

He was a Second Lieutenant in the "C" Battery, 315th Brigade   Royal Field Artillery. 
He died, aged 25, on the 30th August 1918.
He is buried in the Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, Pas de Calais, France.[4]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour. 

He was awarded The 1914/15 Star, The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate560 198
[2]1901 Census 560B 036 009
[3]1911 Census 560 001 073
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/179493/SLOAN,%20ARTHUR%20JAMES
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

Duncan Robertson Moir Smith

He was born on the 21st July 1897 at 4 Cecil Street, Govan, Glasgow to  Robert Smith (Clothier) and Elizabeth Smith (ms Moir).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 3, at 15 Clifford Street, Govan with his parents and siblings Catherine A (13), Elizabeth M (10), Jane D (8), Mary M (7), Robert L (5) and George W (1).[2]

In 1911 he lived, age 13, at Mansfield, 27 St Andrew’s Drive, Pollokshields with his parents and siblings. [3]

He was a Second Lieutenant in the 1st Battalion Royal Scots.
He died, aged 20, on the 27th August 1917.
He is buried in the Hargicourt British Cemetery. Ainse, France.[4]

“On leaving the Academy he went to Allan Glen's and the Royal Technical College. He qualified as a Civil and Mining Engineer, and was employed by Mr. Harry W. Lewin, 154 West Regent Street, Glasgow.” [5]

His death was reported in the Scotsman on the 7th November 1917. He is commemorated in the Glasgow Roll of Honour (address (20 Carment Drive, Shawlands).  

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[6]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 646/1 553
[2]1901 Census 646A/2 035 038
[3]1911 Census 644/18 029 045
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/179493/SLOAN,%20ARTHUR%20JAMES
[5]Bellahouston Academy Roll of Honour
[6]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

Andrew Stevenson

He was born on the 16th February 1893, at 113 Kenmure Street, Pollokshields, Glasgow to Andrew Stevenson and Margaret Stevenson (ms Laidlaw).[1]

In 1901, he lived, age 8, at 29 Herriet Street, Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents Andrew (45) and Margaret (40), and siblings Margaret W (9) and George L (5).[2]

In 1911 he lived, age 18, at 165 Kenmure Street, Pollokshields, Glasgow, with his mother, Margaret (50), and siblings. He was a clerk in a Chartered Accountant’s office. [3]

He was a Private (Service No: S/14957) in the 11th Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He died on the 16th September 1916.
He is buried in Dernancourt Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France. Grave Reference: II. C. 13.[4]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour and The Evening Times Roll of Honour on page 3 of the edition of the 5th October 1916. There is a photo. He is also commemorated in The High School of Glasgow Book of Service and Remembrance. 

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/13 145
[2]1901 Census 644/13 036 090
[3]1911 Census 644/18 016 046
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/427453/stevenson,-/
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

David James Stevenson

He was born on the 5th December 1892 at 3 Royal Terrace, Springburn, Glasgow to William Stevenson (Mercantile Secretary) and Helen Jamieson Stevenson (ms Bone). [1]

In 1901 he lived, age 8, at 22 The Drive, Cranbrook Park, Ilford, Essex, England with his parents and siblings William C (15), Douglas C (12), Francis H (5) and Helen J B (1).[2]

In 1911 he lived, age 18, at 44 Keir Street, Pollokshields with his parents and siblings Douglas C and Helen J B. He was an Iron Broker’s clerk.[3]

Son of Mr. and Mrs. William Stevenson, of 22, Terregles Avenue, Pollokshields, Glasgow.
He was a Second Lieutenant in the 5th Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles).
He died, aged 23, on the 22nd June 1916.
He is buried in the Gorre British and Indian Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.[4]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour (address 33 Fotheringay Road) and in The Evening Times Roll of Honour on page 3 of the edition of the 28th June 1916.

He was awarded The 1914/15 Star, The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/3 2218
[2]1901 Census of England 14/1649/168 003 016
[3]1911 Census 644/18 017 102
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/593003/STEVENSON,%20DAVID%20JAMES
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

Henry Drysdale Strang

He was born on the 30th September 1897 at 10 Rothesay Gardens, Partick, Lanarkshire to Peter Strang (Bank Clerk) and Janet Strang (ms Scobie).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 3, at 1 St Georges Terrace, Kilbarchan, Renfrewshire with his parents and sister Alice M (5).[2]

Son of Peter and Janet Strang, of "Hardale," Balvie Rd., Milngavie, Dunbartonshire. Born at Glasgow.
He was a Private in the 16th Battalion Highland Light Infantry (Service No: 14773) 
He died, aged 19, on the 6th July 1917.
He is buried in the Ramscappelle Road Military Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.[3]

He is commemorated on The Albert Road Academy War Memorial. He is also commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour (address 65 Cadder Street)

He was awarded The 1914/15 Star, The Victory and The British War Medals[4]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 646/3 1371
[2]1901 Census 559 003 048
[3]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/164591/STRANG,%20HENRY%20DRYSDALE
[4]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

William Fitzsimmons Thomson

He was born on the 24th November 1894 at 106 Stanley Street, Kinning Park, Glasgow to James Thomson and Mary Thomson (ms Fitzsimmons).[1]

In 1901, he lived, age 6, at 106 Stanley Street, Kinning Park, Glasgow, with his parents James (30) and Mary (30) and siblings James (8), Robert (4) and Mary (1).[2]

In 1911, he lived, age 16, at 158 Stanley Street, Kinning Park, Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents and siblings James (18), Robert (13), Mary (11), Jeanie (7), Emily (4) and John (1). He was and iron founder. [3]

He was a Serjeant (Service No: 265075) in the 1st/7th Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)
He died on the 2nd November 1917 aged 22.
He is buried in the Gaza War Cemetery, Israel an Palestine (including Gaza) Grave Reference:XVI. B. 15.
He was the son of James and Mary Thomson of 158, Stanley St., Kinning Park, Glasgow.[4]

He is commemorated in the Evening Times Roll of Honour on page 2 of the edition of the 24th November 1917 and page 6 of the edition of the 27th November 1917.  There is a photo.

He is commemorated in the Glasgow Roll of Honour.

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/14 1061
[2]1901 Census 644/14A 012 145
[3]1911 Census 644/18 035 079
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/651496/thomson,-william/
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

James Threshie

He was born on the 15th September 1882 at Clincarthill, Rutherglen to John Morton Threshie (Writer, Glasgow) and. Ellen Neilson Threshie, (ms Brown).[1]

His father was the Procurator Fiscal, County Buildings, Glasgow.

In 1891 he lived, age 8, at Crosslea, Nithsdale Road, Govan with his parentsand sisters Ellen N B (10) and Mary A M (6).[2]

In 1901 he lived, age 18, at 274 Nithsdale Road, Govan with his parents and siblings Ellen, Mary and Francis (1). He was an apprentice electrical engineer).[3]

He was educated at Bellahouston Academy and The High School of Glasgow.

He went to Canada in 1904 where he was employed as an Electrical and Marine Engineer with the Canadian Pacific Railway. He volunteered and joined the 88th Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force. He was a Sergeant in 7th Battalion Canadian Infantry (Service No: 180563). He died, aged 34, on the 9th April 1917 at Vimy Ridge. His Lieutenant wrote: "I had not been in command of the platoon for long, but I had formed a very good opinion of him. And if he had been fortunate enough to come through, I had looked for great things from him. His death is a loss to me and the platoon." [4]

He is buried in the Nine Elms Military Cemetery, Thelus, Pas de Calais, France.[5]

He is commemorated on The Bellahouston War Memorial and in The High School of Glasgow Book of Service and Remembrance. He is also commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour.   

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[6]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 654 410
[2]1891 Census 646/1 037 012
[3]1901 Census 646A/1 002 014
[4]De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour, 1914-1919, Volume 3
[5]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/297442/THRESHIE,%20JAMES
[6]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

David Waddell

He was born on the 26th September 1895 at 136 Blythswood Drive, Glasgow to George Bell Waddell and Margaret Waddell (ms Boyes).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 5, at Dicksons Braeside Cottage, Bothwell, Lanarkshire with his mother and sister Jeanie H (4).[2]

In 1911 he lived, age 15, at 178 Kenmure Street, Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents and sisters Jeanie H and Janet T (7).[3]

Only son of George B. and Margaret Waddell, of 13, Princes St., Pollokshields, Glasgow.
He was a Private in the 2nd Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Service No: S/14069)
He died, aged 20, on the 30th August 1916.
He is commemorated on Pier and Face 15 A and 16 C of the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France.[4]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour.

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/9 1445
[2]1901 Census 625/1 002 024
[3]1911 Census 644/18 017 065
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/818129/WADDELL,%20DAVID
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

James H. Waddell

He was born on the 25th March 1892 at 1 Wellroad Place, Crossmyloof, Glasgow to James and Isabella Waddell[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 9, at 1131 Pollokshaws Road, Cathcart, Renfrewshire, with his parents James (47) and Isabella (47) and his siblings Mary (16), Maggie (13) and Isabella (11).[2]

He was a Lance Corporal in the 7th Bn., British Columbia Regiment, Canadian Infantry (Service Number 429610)

He died on the 10th November 1917, aged 24

Son of Isabella Allison Waddell, of 58, Westmoreland St., Crosshill, South Side, Glasgow, Scotland, and the late James Waddell.

Commemorated at Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium 
Memorial reference: Panel 18 - 28 - 30.[3]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 560 109
[2]1901 Census 560B 019 097
[3]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1596795/waddell,-james/

 

John Walker

Son of John Sharp Walker and Elizabeth Walker. Born about 1895 in Glasgow.

In 1901 he lived, age 5, at Myrtle Bank, Grangemuir Road, Prestwick, Ayrshire with his parents and siblings Janet T (12), James (10), Elizabeth (8) and Louise (2).[1]

In 1911 he lived, age 15, at Shawfield, 19 St Andrew’s Drive, Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents and siblings Jenny, Elizabeth and Louise M. He was a commercial apprentice.[2]

He was a Second Lieutenant in the 14th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers.
He died, aged 21, on the 1st July 1916.
He is commemorated on Pier and Face 10B, 11B and 12B of the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France.[3]

He is commemorated in The High School of Glasgow Book of Service and Remembrance and in The Glasgow Roll of Honour and on The University of Glasgow website.[4]

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]1901 Census 606 003 008
[2]1911 Census 644/18 029 042
[3]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/818500/WALKER,%20JOHN
[4]https://www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk/ww1-biography/?id=3433
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

John Thomson Tweedly Walker

He was born on the 30th September 1877 at Green Street, Bothwell, Lanarkshire to John Walker (Journeyman Gardener) and Ann Baillie Walker (ms Jack).[1]

In 1881 he lived, age 3, at Green Street, Bothwell, Lanarkshire, with his parents John (50) and Ann B J (33) and siblings Jessie (7), David M (5) and William (1).[2]

In 1891 he lived, age 13, at 105 St Andrews Road, Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents and siblings Jessie, David, William and Alexander D (7). He was a photographer’s apprentice. [3]

In 1901 he lived, age 23, at 73, St. Andrew's Rd., Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents and siblings David, and Alexander. He was a photographer operator.[4]

In 1911 he lived, age 33, at 73, St. Andrew's Rd., Pollokshields, Glasgow with his mother and siblings David, Agnes and Alexander. He was a photographer.[5]

He was a Lance Corporal in the 16th Battalion Highland Light Infantry (Service No: 30312).
He died, aged 39, on the 18th November 1916.
He is buried in the Waggon Road Cemetery, Beaumont-Hamel, Somme, France.[6]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour. 

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[7]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 625/1 410
[2]1881 Censusm625/1 001 067
[3]1891 Census 644/13 037 039
[4]1901 Census 644/13 029 022
[5]1911 Census 644/18 012 015
[6]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/524373/WALKER,%20JOHN%20THOMSON%20TWEEDLY
[7]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

George Wallace

He was born on the 21st May1894 at 263 Maxwell Road, Pollokshields, Glasgow to John Wallace and Mary Wallace (ms Wilson).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 6, at 263 Maxwell Road, Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents John (55) and Mary (51) and his siblings Jane Y (23), Janet H (22), James (20), John (18), William (14) and Matthew (11).[2]

In 1911 he lived, age 16, at 19 Keir Street Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents and his siblings Janet H (32), John (28) and Matthew (21).[3]

He was a Corporal (Service No: 1073) in "B" Coy. 1st/7th Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)
He died on the 28th June 1915, aged 21
He was buried in the Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, Turkey, Grave Reference: Sp. Mem. C. 444.[4]

He is commemorated in The Evening Times Roll of Honour on page 6 of the edition of the 22nd July 1915, in The Glasgow Roll of Honour and on The Albert Road Academy War Memorial.

He was awarded The 1914/15 Star, The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/13 350
[2]1901 Census 644/13 036 164
[3]1911 Census 644/18 018 022
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/603667/wallace,-george/
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

Robert Boyd Wallace

He was born on the 9th November 1882 at Port Argyll, Campbeltown, Argyll to Martin Wallace (Mason) and Margaret Wallace (ms Paterson).[1]

In 1891 he lived, age 8, at High Street, Campbeltown with his parents and siblings Hugh (22), Martin (20), Dugald D (15), Catherine B (13) Samuel B (4) and George B (8 months).[2]

In 1901 he lived, 19, at Flush Farm, Campbeltown, with his parents and siblings Duguld D, Catherine B, Samuel B and George B.He was a joiner’s apprentice.[3]

In 1911 he lived, age 29, at 30 Nithsdale Street, Strathbungo, Glasgow with his parents and brother George. He was a house joiner. [4]

On the 8th September 1917 he married Lizzie Amelia Stewart Watson at 15 Keir Street, Pollokshields, Glasgow.[5]

He was a Serjeant in the 5th Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) (Service No: 200008).
He died on the 29th November 1917.
He is buried in the Brandhoek New Military Cemetery No.3, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.[6]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour 

He was awarded The 1914/15 Star, The Victory and The British War Medals[7]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 507 320
[2]1891 Census 507 012 007
[3]1901 Census 507 005 033
[4]1911 Census 644/18 011 129
[5]Marriage Certificate 644/18 252
[6]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/140589/WALLACE,%20ROBERT%20BOYD
[7]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

John Knox Waterston

He was born on the 24th June 1897 at 250 North Woodside Road, Kelvin, Glasgow to John Waterson and Agnes Darroch Waterston (ms Barclay).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 3, at 7 Carlton Gardens, Maryhill, Lanarkshire with his parents. [2]

In 1911 he was a pupil at Dollar Academy and stayed at Westview, Dollar, Clackmannan with Mr and Mrs. Richard Malcolm.[3]

In 1907 his mother, sister Agnes and brother William were drowned in an accident off Cumbrae.[4]

Son of John Waterston, of Whinfell, Kilmacolm, Renfrewshire.
He was a Private in the 5th Battalion Cameron Highlanders (Service No: S/41020)
He died, aged 20, on the 20th September 1917.
He is commemorated on Panel 136 to 138 on the Tyne Cot Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.[5]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour, with his address being 4 Dolphin Road. Maxwell Park. 

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[6]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/9 981
[2]1901 Census 622/1 001 006
[3]1911 Census 467 003 044
[4]http://memento-mori-scotland.blogspot.com/2013/10/boating-disaster-at-millport.html
[5]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/826137/WATERSTON,%20JOHN%20KNOX
[6]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

James Stewart Westwater

He was born on the 26th September 1898 at 9 Govanhill Street, Gorbals, Glasgow to Robert Westwater and Lizzie Westwater (ms Haddleton).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 2, at 9 Govanhill Street, Gorbals, Glasgow with his parents and sister Janie (7).[2]

In 1911 he lived, age 12, at 32 Waverley Gardens, Langside, Glasgow with his parents and sister.[3]

He was a Private in 9th Bn. Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) (Service Number 76329)
He died on the 9th June 1917
He is commemorated at Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.
Memorial reference: Panel 39 and 41.[4]

He is commemorated in The Glasgow Roll of Honour with address 105 St. Andrew’s Drive, Pollokshields

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/12 1130
[2]1901 Census 644/12 057 006
[3]1911 Census 560 012 197
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/913647/westwater,-james-s./
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

Andrew Whitelaw

He was born on the 14th June 1892 at 119 Plantation Street, Govan Glasgow to Andrew Whitelaw (Harbour Labourer) and Isabella Whitelaw (ms Brown).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 8, at 126 Plantation Street, Govan, Glasgow with his parents Andrew and Isa and siblings John (15), David (12) and Annie (5).[2]

In 1911 he lived, age 18, at 84 Plantation Street, Govan with his mother and siblings. [3]

He was a Private in the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders (Service No: 9028).
He died, aged 23, on the 30th April 1916.
He is buried in the Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.[4]

He was awarded The 1914/15 Star, The Victory and The British War Medals[5]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 646/1 441
[2]1901 Census 646A/2 012 109
[3]1911 Census 646/1 009 144
[4]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/155768/WHITELAW,%20A
[5]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

Robert Smith Wiseman

He was born on the 30th July 1897 at 275 Golfhill Drive, Dennistoun, Glasgow, to James Wiseman and Helen Campbell Wiseman (ms Smith).[1]

In 1901 he lived, age 3, at Jamesland, Herries Road, Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents James (32) and Nellie (32) and his siblings William (5) and Margaret Campbell (2).[2]

His mother died in 1903.[3]

In 1911 he lived, age 13, at 1 Herries Road, Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents James (42) and Barbara (38) and his siblings William (15), Margaret Campbell (12), Elizabeth Scott Blair (9), James Campbell (1) and Barbara Douglas (4 months).[4]

He was a Bombardier in the 377th Battery, 169th Brigade Royal Field Artillery (Service No: 661054).
He died, aged 20, on the 22nd May 1918.
He is buried in the Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France.
Son of James and Barbara Douglas Wiseman, of Glasgow.[5]

He is commemorated in the Evening Times Roll of Honour on page 4 of the edition of the 31st July 1918. There is a photo.

He was awarded The Victory and The British War Medals[6]
See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/3 1570
[2]1901 Census 644/14 029 021
[3]Death Certificate 644/14 337
[4]1911 Census 644/18 023 059
[5]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/79726/WISEMAN,%20ROBERT%20SMITH
[6]WW1 Medals Rolls Index

 

James Stewart Wyper

He was born on the 9th December 1885 at 47 Albert Drive, Pollokshields to James Wyper (Wine Merchant) and Janet Stewart Wyper (ms Peters).[1]

In 1891 he lived, age 5, at Bellfield, 47 Albert Drive, Pollokshields, Glasgow with his parents and siblings Margaret E (10) and John (8).[2]

1n 1901 he lived, age 15, at Nithsdale Lodge, 204 Nithsdale Road with his parents and siblings. He was a Shipping Clerk.[3]

On the 15th June 1916 he returned from Lonquimay, Chile to United Kingdom on board the “Highland Laddie” from River Plate, South America.[4]

He was a Lieutenant in the 7th/8th Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers.
He died, aged 30, on the 8th September 1916.
He is buried in the St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France.[5]

He was awarded The 1914/15 Star, The Victory and The British War Medals[6]

See his Commonwealth War Graves Commission's entry here. Back

[1]Birth Certificate 644/14 1186
[2]1891 Census 644/14 039 044
[3]1901 Census 644/14 031 033
[4]United Kingdom Incoming Passenger Lists
[5]https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/172957/WYPER,%20JAMES%20STEWART
[6]WW1 Medals Rolls Index


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